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Petro urbanisms final pice-blast

LSE Cities’ workshop: Petro-urbanisms: Urban futures on the oil frontier

Tuesday 8 July 2014, 14.00 – 18.00
Room 9.04, Research Centre Meeting Suite, 9th Floor, Tower  2, London School of Economics and Political Science

Today urbanisation processes in many parts of the globe are directly linked to the hydro carbon economy, producing forms of urbanism that emerge from the often significant finances being generated, the struggle over control of these resources and the contested futures of these rapidly growing cities. Together with the planetary scale infrastructures required to sustain contemporary urban life it is clear that oil is integral to how we understand cities. In this workshop these petro-urbanisms are interrogated to investigate how uncertainty mediates unfolding urbanisation across and beyond oil regions, the politics of these material transformations and the ways that imaginaries, responses and contestations of the urban future can be understood as deeply entwined with global infrastructures of oil.

Speakers include:

Andrew Barry (Department of Geography, UCL)
Chloé Buire (Department of Geography, Durham University)
Nelida Fuccaro (Department of History, SOAS)
Matt Wilde (Department of Anthropology, LSE)
ThienVinh Nguyen (Department of Geography, UCL)
Gisa Weszkalnys (Department of Anthropology, LSE)

Free but booking essential. Click here to book your place.

The Urban Uncertainty workshop series is an integral part of LSE Cities’ collaborative investigation into emerging ways of envisioning and governing the future of cities. Each session focuses on a different dimension of urban uncertainty, from health and housing to crime and climate, and brings together scholars from a handful of disciplines whose work converges on common themes. Events are open to the public but are kept deliberately small in order to encourage focused conversation.

 
 
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